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20 Best Hammer Drills of 2021

The best hammer drills may not be as commonly used as power drills among DIY home enthusiasts. But, nevertheless, it’s a very useful tool to have at your disposal. Mainly for driving screws and boring holes into metal, brick, wood stone, and hard surfaces. Just one look at a hammer drill and you know that the hefty size is capable of handling tough applications. Along with its several control settings, auxiliary handle, and more. It’s actually the coming together of a small jackhammer, impact driver, and regular drill. But the tricky part is choosing the right type of hammer drill for your home projects. In that case, allow us to narrow down the tedious process for you…


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Choosing the Best Hammer Drill

You’re inevitably going to stumble upon more than one type of hammer drill. So how do you decide which version is the most suitable for your projects? By taking the most important features into account…

1. Cordless vs. Corded

The power source is the first thing that comes to mind, right? Should you buy a drill outfitted with a heavy-duty cord? Or do you prefer the convenience of rechargeable batteries? Well, it’s not as simple as that. And here’s why…

Corded hammer drills deliver continuous power. Also, they’re more powerful in comparison to their battery-operated counterparts. And it’s this very reason that makes the corded models more reliable and effective for long-term use. You simply plug them into extension cords for a longer reach. But then, ultimately, you need electricity for the job, right?

On the contrary, cordless ones do not demand electricity to run. At the same time, they feel smaller, easier, and lighter to handle. Most DIY enthusiasts prefer cordless drills because of their versatility and portability around the house for different types of projects. However, you have to go through the trouble of changing the batteries after certain hours of use.

2. Power and Speed

In terms of power, the higher the RPM, the greater the range of the hammer drill for heavy-duty applications. But then avoid a higher RPM if you don’t have such demands. Because you don’t want to be dealing with a heavier, more difficult to handle tool unnecessarily.

Then comes the variable speed aspect. Speed control in a drill is one of the most important characteristics. You absolutely need variable speed when drilling metal and wood. But not so much for masonry projects, which requires just the standard mode.

3. Mode

Let’s start with the hammer mode. With this, you get the pulsating action for driving masonry bits into hard surfaces. For example, stone, concrete, and brick. On top of that, the drill preserves the rotational action for drilling and punching through hard materials. As in the case of a jackhammer plus auger, but slightly less powerful.

The next is the drill mode. And it consists of variable speed, which ranges between 1 and 3. This particular mode offers a torque that’s more controlled. It’s primarily put in place to drill holes into softer surfaces like plastic or wood.

The last one is the drive mode. These hammer drills are equipped with this setting for removing and driving screws. There’s no pulsating hammer setting force. Instead, it uses the setting of torque adjustment to perform precision work. Such as driving a screw into the deck. The power setting, in this case, is low to prevent the torque from stripping the screws.

4. Safety

Safety and handling even one of the best hammer drills go hand in hand. When working with a power tool, you have to ensure that it’s designed with adequate safety features for preventing accidents. Your safety during application should be a priority, no matter the cost of your drill.

So what are these safety features? More often than not, they take the form of an integral clutch, automatic bit locking, and overheating protection.

5. Additional Features

The add-ons are a part of the hammer drilling experience to make the application more effective, comfortable, and faster. For example, the 360 degrees auxiliary handle offers the most comfortable grip when working in tight, enclosed, or complex spaces.

Another very useful additional feature is an integrated flashlight. So there’s no need for separate illumination.


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q1. What Are the Uses of A Hammer Drill?

Also called a percussion drill, hammer drills are made to drill into hard surfaces like brick, rock, and concrete. They are designed with percussive force, which is exactly what mimics the manual hammering of a nail into the material. Standard drills, on the other hand, use the rotary motion for turning the bit into the chuck.

In the case of hammer drills, when the bit turns, the drill drives it through the hole with the help of the tool’s forward motion.

Q2. What Is the Difference Between Regular Impact Drill and Hammer Drill?

The primary differences include the method of application, purpose, and appearance. The regular drill is used to drive in screws and nails. It works the best in the case of regular drilling jobs. Meaning these impact drills are not made for tasks that demand extra power.

For drilling into hard surfaces, on the other hand, such as masonry, bricks, or concrete, nothing fits the bill better than a hammer drill.

In terms of appearance, the hammer version is generally bigger and heavier. And it moves backward and forward just like the hammer does. At the same time, hammer drills can be a tad bit loud with more vibrations. And that is why they come with an adjustable clutch to prevent damaging the surface you’re working on.

Q3. Can Hammer Drills Be Used As Regular Drills?

Does the tool have both the standard and hammer settings? If yes, then a hammer drill is good enough to act as the regular version. As opposed to when the power tool offers just the hammer mode.


Conclusion

It makes sense for a handyman to add one of the best hammer drills to their box of useful tools. These power drills are more authoritative than regular drills. Especially when working with hard objects and materials. And the best part about some of them is that you can use them as a regular drill as well.

Hammer drills, generally speaking, are made for projects that involve stone, concrete, brick, and other such hard surfaces. In fact, the diamond-tip bit makes the tool versatile enough for a broad variety of projects.